Pending KPERS Legislation

Keeping the Kansas Promise is watching ___ pieces of legislation in the 2011 legislative session.

House Bill 2086 is an interim committee bill from the Joint Committee on Pensions, Investments and Benefits, which would increase the state’s annual contribution cap from .6 percent (%) to 1.0 percent (%). Unfortunately, House Bill 2086 was not “blessed” for the turnaround by an exempt committee and is considered, in its present form, a dead bill. Read more…

House Bill 2310 would suspend KPERS retirement benefits for KPERS retirees who return to work in KPERS covered positions. Under current law, KPERS retirees may return to work in a KPERS covered position and earn up to $20,000 annually before the KPERS benefit is suspended. The KKP Coalition opposes HB 2310. Read more…

 

House Bill 2311 is an identical bill to House Bill 2715 from the 2010 legislative session. The legislation would create a new Tier III for all newly hired public employees, placing those employees into a defined contribution system. The KKP Coalition and coalition partners are categorically opposed to HB 2311. Read more…

House Bill 2328 would require school districts to contribute to the costs of KPERS contributions on behalf of employees. Under current law, the state of Kansas makes the full, though not actuarially required payment to school districts, which in turn make the payment on behalf of district employees to the KPERS fund. HB 2328 would require school districts to contribute one (1) percent (%) of the contribution to the fund beginning in calendar year 2011 and would require an amount not to exceed one (1) percent (%) each subsequent year.

 

 

Senate Bill 49 is aimed at shoring up the long term unfunded liabilities of the KPERS fund. The bill would perform one of three amendments to the current KPERS system: (i) increase the state’s annual contribution increase cap from .6 percent (%) to 1.0 percent (%); (ii) increase the multiplier on the final average salary of KPERS retirees; and (iii) increase the employee contribution rates by two (2) percent (%) over the next two (2) years, making the contributions of Tier I members six (6) percent (%) and of Tier II members eight (8) percent (%).  Read more…